How to be healthy during the holidays

How to be healthy during the holidays

With high expectations of happiness and cheer comes pressure, stress and disappointment. Whether it’s external pressure from society, mental health or physical health, we have to redefine what healthy living means for us as individuals.

Whether you’ve learned it through your college physics class or from season 2, episode 1 of Rick and Morty, the theory of Schrödinger’s cat is a well-known concept. And it’s one that I actively live by.

In the small chance that you are unfamiliar with this theory, here’s the gist:

There’s a cat in a box with a flask of poison. It is simultaneously both dead and alive until it is observed and confirmed as one or the other.

So, you’re probably wondering how this quantum mechanics theory affects my daily life. Well, let me translate it for you:

You won’t know what will happen until you do it.

As someone who is an avid over-thinker and consistently indecisive, I have to remind myself of this theory often. From professional commitments to spontaneous travel plans, this thought-process has helped me in multiple facets of my life this past year.

More importantly, it has given me the push to shift towards a more healthy lifestyle. As a young woman growing up in a modern society, I have always been self-aware enough to know that both my physical and mental health, especially the co-dependency of the two,  could use some improvement.

Contrary to what most might believe, it was actually easier to tackle my physical health first.

I would often go to bed motivated with plans to get up and run the next morning. Ha! Who was I fooling? Only myself. Because the next morning I would be too tired or convince myself that that was a pointless attempt of trying to get in shape.

Until one day I shifted my mindset. I thought of Schrödinger and his theory. How would I know it was pointless unless I just did it?

So you’re probably thinking, okay, so she started running.

Well, not quite. I still hate running.

But the point is, I took control. I worked out every day. Counted my macros. Tracked my weight. And I made great progress. Physically.

Then I realized I was starting to lose control mentally.

I have never really believed in the effects of positive self-talk and daily affirmations. How can kind words from my own head drown out the negative thoughts coming from the same place? Well I won’t know until I try.

So I took control of my mental health. Or rather, I am taking control of it – it’s definitely still a work in progress.

With the holidays approaching, I am beginning to feel the pressure weighing down on the fragile control I have over my health. Will I be able to enjoy myself throughout the holiday festivities without feeling guilty? Will I start the new year full of regret?

And those are just thoughts surrounding one part of my life.

Despite being known as the season of joy and giving, the holidays have a deceptive way of unearthing our most vulnerable selves.

With high expectations of happiness and cheer comes pressure, stress and disappointment. Whether it’s external pressure from society, mental health or physical health, we have to redefine what healthy living means for us as individuals.

Then we adjust to the change and embrace it.

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